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Shantigarh: Sheet Music Download

Praise the Lord, My Soul

This is one of Shantigarh's first originals and it belongs in your contemporary repertoire.  $5 gets you 25 authorized photocopies and here's where you download.

Lover of Souls

(Shantigarh)

PDF: $5.00 authorizes buyer for 20 photocopies.

You'll like the way this builds.  You'll need a good piano or organ player.  Download here for $5 and you can make 25 authorized copies. 

Tell This Generation

(Shantigarh)

Sheet music now available for Tell This Generation.  Your $5 download entitles you to make 25 legal copies.  What a deal!

Veni Creator Spiritus

(Shantigarh)
John Bonaduce

Download sheet music for Veni Creator Spiritus here.  Your $5 purchase entitles you to make 25 copies.  It's the honor system. 

As The Deer Longs

(Shantigarh)
John Bonaduce

Sheet music download available now for As the Deer Longs, from the Shantigarh Requiem for the Unborn.

In Every Age

Your $5 purchase authorizes you to make 25 copies of this amazing hip-hop-with-Italian-influences setting of Psalm 90.

 

Kingdom of Heaven

(Shantigarh)

Kingdom of Heaven is the heart and soul of the Shantigarh Requiem for the Unborn; read the lyrics and you'll see why it appropriate and a musical counterpart to Christ's exceedingly metaphoric descriptions of the Kingdom.  Like a baker?  Really?  A waltz with a sweet piano part, Shantigarh has also performed it against one solo acoustic guitar--and chords are included.

I Will Rise and Go

The Catholic lectionary pairs the refrain with Psalm 51 so that the theology of healing, is explored in song; healing of body and of soul and the mysterious way Christ equates the two.  Some people say this sounds Irish.  Go figure.

Hand of the Lord

Here's where a good drummer really helps.  This is a relentless beat but no hymn can survive the guy who just hits too hard.  That's why you need somebody llike Ed Sandon, the Shantigarh drummer.

This I Know

(Shantigarh)

This is the recessional from the Shantigarh Requiem for the Unborn.  It is a determinedly happy Gospel piece, meant to be restorative, relaxing and uplifting after the heavy-lifting of an important liturgy.  It's a good way to end any Sunday service and people should be invited to clap.  We usually wait until after the second verse to start clapping because once you start you pretty much have to keep it up.  That's a whole lot of clapping. 

Shantigarh Alleluia

This is our idea of a brilliant way to announce the gospel--what Catholics call the "gospel acclamation."  Do Protestants call it a gospel acclamation?  They will find it useful, too.  Remember, if one of the three accompanying verses doesn't come close enough to the weekly verse, just trust your own musicianship and massage the text to fit the notes.  You can do it!  We do it all the time. 

God's Girl

I Never Saw Him Calm The Sea

Beatitudes

Our Help is From the Lord

God in Your Goodness

God In Your Goodness consoles two classes of people:  the poor and Church musicians.  Psalm 68 has always given to God the role of protector with partiality toward the have-nots.  This setting has some unique progressions and the piano accompaniment, while not difficult, proves that diatonic dissonances did not lose their punch in the 20th Century.

Seventy Times Seven

I Sing the Mighty Power of God

The Vineyard of the Lord

There's a Wideness in God' Mercy

Forever I Will Sing

Prayer of the Faithful

Alleluia

They Who Believe

Holy, Holy, Holy

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